Offertory Prayer

Each month's Offertory Prayers includes an "Invitation to the Offering" (see below) along with a digital image for those who might want to use it. We hope you will find this a helpful way to remind the people in your pews that their offering travels to many places to make a powerful difference in the lives of people they may never meet. You can find great stories of the difference our giving makes at http://umcgiving.org.

Invitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as our Archives and History Center on the campus of Drew University in Madison, NJ. Here, a small group of dedicated archivists preserve the history and artifacts that keep us connected to our past – what they call “the ministry of memories.” By preserving historical photographs, sound recordings, published documents in digital formats, as well as treasures such as the Bible used by Francis Asbury or the journals and handwritten notes of John Wesley, scholars of today can be reconnected with our beginnings when we were more of a movement than an institution. Many in the church hope that this Holy Spirit movement can be recovered for a new generation, and those hopes are made possible through the work of our Commission on Archives and History. This ministry happens, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about the General Commission on Archives and History at http://www.gcah.org

April 26, 2015 – Fourth Sunday of Easter
O Lord, you are the good shepherd! Your son Jesus laid down his life for all who belong to you. Thank you for nurturing our life and sustaining our faith. In gratitude, we want to help others to know your love. Open our ears to listen to your voice. Open our eyes to see our brothers and sisters in need as sheep of your flock. May our tithes and offerings give voice to Christ's love for all people, especially those who have gone astray. Amen. (John 10:11-18)

April Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship Ministries at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.

Friday, January 28, 2011

Admission Requirements, a Reflection on Psalm 15

The reading from Micah this week proclaims what the Lord requires of us--to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God. The lectionary response is Psalm 15 which begins with the question, "Who is allowed in?"

The requirements for admission are:
to walk blamelessly and to do what is right and speak the truth

do not slander, do no evil to friends, and do not reproach your neighbors

stand by your oath--even to your hurt

do not lend money at interest, don't take a bribe.

Those seeking acceptance in the congregation were supposed to modify their behavior outside the building. Further integration--they had been told what was right and, now, they were supposed to live out what they had been told.

Their relationship with God is affected by, even dependent on, their relationship with their community. Moreover, doing the right thing changes the doer: "Those who do these thing shall never be moved."

1 comment:

Joel Peterson said...

As a current high school senior, I see countless peers worrying about their "admission decisions" to their dream colleges. What I don't see a lot of is initiative about entrance into heaven. I think most of them think that heaven is something for old people to worry about.

What I see even less of though, is people who are active in their faith enough at a young age to be to the point of being called by God to a ministerial vocation.

I think we can agree that God's call isn't anywhere near as straightforward as admission to heaven--or college for that matter!

Perhaps a more allegorical/exploratory approach is what we need to implement in order to get young people thinking about their call.

*insert plug for my book, which attempts to do just that. haha*

It's called The Journey (by Joel Peterson, obviously) and it's on Amazon.com if you are interested in checking it out.