Offertory Prayer

Invitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church that reach people who are in desperate need to feel the touch of love and reconciliation. Through the World Service Fund, your church supports a network of dedicated, faithful missionaries. Working with the support of our General Board of Global Ministries, servants like Clara Biswas do ministry in our name. Clara’s work with the children of Cambodia, who live in deepest poverty, has changed lives. In partnership with UM Women, her work has led to the building of a school near the garbage dump where these children scavenge to help their families. This ministry happens thanks to the generous support of United Methodists like you. I invite you once again to give generously as we worship God through the sharing of our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about the work of our General Board of Global Ministries Missionaries at:www.umcmission.org/Explore-Our-Work/Missionaries-in-Service/Missionary-Landing

October 26, 2014 -- Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost/in Kingdomtide
God who guides us on the journey, we offer our tithes and offerings to you, and pray that the gifts we give might be used to bring your kingdom here on earth. Often, it feels like we won’t get to see it; and like Moses we will make the journey, but never get to cross into the place you have promised. Strengthen us, by your Spirit, to stay true to the journey, and to look toward the destination, not with our eyes or ears but with our hearts. We pray in the blessed name of Jesus, our Rock and the light of the world. Amen. (Deuteronomy 34:1-12)


Prayers by Ken Sloan. Copyright General Board of Discipleship. www.GBOD.org Used by permission."

Friday, January 28, 2011

Admission Requirements, a Reflection on Psalm 15

The reading from Micah this week proclaims what the Lord requires of us--to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God. The lectionary response is Psalm 15 which begins with the question, "Who is allowed in?"

The requirements for admission are:
to walk blamelessly and to do what is right and speak the truth

do not slander, do no evil to friends, and do not reproach your neighbors

stand by your oath--even to your hurt

do not lend money at interest, don't take a bribe.

Those seeking acceptance in the congregation were supposed to modify their behavior outside the building. Further integration--they had been told what was right and, now, they were supposed to live out what they had been told.

Their relationship with God is affected by, even dependent on, their relationship with their community. Moreover, doing the right thing changes the doer: "Those who do these thing shall never be moved."

1 comment:

Joel Peterson said...

As a current high school senior, I see countless peers worrying about their "admission decisions" to their dream colleges. What I don't see a lot of is initiative about entrance into heaven. I think most of them think that heaven is something for old people to worry about.

What I see even less of though, is people who are active in their faith enough at a young age to be to the point of being called by God to a ministerial vocation.

I think we can agree that God's call isn't anywhere near as straightforward as admission to heaven--or college for that matter!

Perhaps a more allegorical/exploratory approach is what we need to implement in order to get young people thinking about their call.

*insert plug for my book, which attempts to do just that. haha*

It's called The Journey (by Joel Peterson, obviously) and it's on Amazon.com if you are interested in checking it out.