Offertory Prayer

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as the quadrennial gathering of United Methodist youth and adults that happened last month in Orlando at YOUTH 2015! This event brought more than 4800 people together to challenge our youth to embrace their Methodist identity and to “Go On” to a deeper relationship with Christ. The testimonies of lives changed are powerful, and the impact will go on for years. These kinds of cooperative efforts across our connection are made possible thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about ministry with youth and young adults at: http://globalyoungpeople.org

August 30, 2015 – Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost / in Kingdomtide

Generous and Holy God, every good and perfect gift that touches our lives does indeed come from above, provided through your gracious and boundless love. We bring these gifts, such a small portion of what we have received by your hand, and doing so join them with others that we might be found to be doers of the word and not listeners only. We pray this is the name of Jesus the Christ, our rock and our redeemer. Amen. (James 1:17-27)

August Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.



Thursday, January 10, 2013

Gathering, a Reflection on Isaiah 43:3-7

Isaiah was speaking to a people who knew great distress and disruption. He reminded them that the Lord their God had rescued their ancestors and would rescue them as well.

Every year (or, alrmost every year) I read Disciplines, the book of daily devotions published by Upper Rooms Books.

The entry for January 7, 2010, written by Cristian de la Rosa, talks about the experience of African and Latin American people who have struggled, and are struggling. The words of assurance from Isaiah are still timely--because people are still struggling.
It is very difficult to discern the voice of God in our own time. ....However, the memory of suffering is there ... and it interrupts history. These interruptions can help us claim our humanity as people of God--again listening to the voice of God and recognizing the accompaniment of God as we walk with those who suffer--in our own suffering or our memory of suffering.
Lectio Divina: Isaiah 43:5; Psalm 29:7-9

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