Offertory Prayer

Invitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church that reach people who are in desperate need to feel the touch of love and reconciliation. Through the World Service Fund, you made possible life-changing mission work led by the General Board of Global Ministries, in areas of clean water and sanitation. Almost 900 million people don’t have access to clean, safe water; and 2.5 billion people do not have safe sanitation. Through partnership across the church and with UMCOR and the Advance for Christ, United Methodists strive to meet this most basic need. This ministry happens thanks to the generous support of United Methodists like you. I invite you once again to give generously as we worship God through the sharing of our gifts, tithes and offerings.

Learn more about the work of the UMC to help people Access Safe Water at:www.umcor.org/UMCOR/Programs/Global-Health/Water-and-Sanitation

July 27, 2014 -- Seventh Sunday after Pentecost/in Kingdomtide
Creator and architect of the universe! You made all of creation and entrusted us, your children, to be stewards of your goodness and your mysteries. We, in turn, see suffering and injustice, so many problems caused by human selfishness and indifference, and we say to ourselves, “What can we do?” Then you remind us that whatever terrible thing comes our way, in Christ we are more than conquerors. As we give our tithes and offerings, let us give in that conviction: not with hands clenched tight around our possessions, but with hands open. “We are more than conquerors through Him who loved us!” In that Holy name, we pray. Amen. (Romans 8:26-39)
(Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43)

"Prayers by Ken Sloan. Copyright General Board of Discipleship. www.GBOD.org Used by permission."

Monday, July 20, 2009

Well, do we have enough bread? a Reflection on John 6:1-14

Verses 1-9
Jesus asks Philip, "Where are you going to get enough bread to feed all these people?"

Since we can assume that Jesus knew the answer already, we can ponder instead why he asked it of Philip.

Jesus knew that they had sufficient resources to take care of the problem in front of them. He needed to know if Philip realized this, or, he needed to make sure that he did.

Andrew recognizes that they have access to some resources but he doesn't think they're enough to attack the problem.

Does any of this sound like modern-day discussions of how to work on society's problems? The need is great, really great. Our resources are limited, really limited.

Try to imagine yourself as Philip or Andrew. How would you respond to Jesus' question?

Verses 10-14
Allen & Williamson, in their excellent Preaching the Gospels, point out the importance of having the crowd sit down:
The Greek is anapesin, "to recline or sit down," not "sit." The point is important, for the rich and the royal lie down to eat. Jesus treats the crowds as royalty. They recline on "a great deal of grass" (an echo Of Psalm 23:2).


What's the message to us--are we not only supposed to feed the strangers but also to treat them well? How far does this go--do we have to include health care, as well?

Lectio Divina: Psalm 145:16
You open your hand, satisfying the desire of every living thing.

1 comment:

dogearedpreacher said...

The disciples, as usual, are clueless. What would be some helpful strategies in the face of our own limited resources? What does it mean to "have faith" in that situation?