Offertory Prayer

Invitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church that reach people who are in desperate need to feel the touch of love and reconciliation. Through the Episcopal Fund, your church not only supports the Bishop who serves your conference, but the global work of our United Methodist episcopal leaders. Your giving makes possible their witness for the whole church in many areas including evangelism, justice ministries, global health and working with the world’s poor. This ministry happens thanks to the generous support of United Methodists like you. I invite you once again to give generously as we worship God through the sharing of our gifts, tithes and offerings.

August 31, 2014 -- Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost/in Kingdomtide

Learn more about the work of the Council of Bishops of the UMC at: http://www.umc.org/who-we-are/council-of-bishops

Holy God, we bring our gifts to your altar this morning, remembering that Jesus told us that if we were truly to be his disciples we would need to “deny ourselves, take up our cross, and follow.” It’s tempting to try to follow, without taking the cross; or to try to follow, without denying ourselves. More often, we seek to simply take the name of “Christian” without the denying, the taking of the cross, or the following. Guide us, Lord, on this journey of discipleship. Use these gifts, and use us. In our Savior’s holy name, we pray. Amen. (Matthew 16:21-28)

"Prayers by Ken Sloan. Copyright General Board of Discipleship. www.GBOD.org Used by permission."

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Gratitude for Deliverance, a Reflection on Psalm 116:1-9

Isaiah had been attacked physically, had been insulted; yet, he was not disgraced because he knew that God would vindicate him.

The lectionary has chosen the first part of Psalm 116 as a response to this reading from Isaiah.

In it, the psalmist in verses 1-6, like Isaiah, is addressing a human audience rather than praying to the Lord. Although his situation sounds like illness rather than personal attack, he,also like Isaiah, has suffered greatly. And, like Isaiah, he had depended on the Lord to save him; and the Lord did.
For you have delivered my soul from death,
my eyes from tears,
my feet from stumbling.
I walk before the Lord in the land of the living.

1 comment:

karim said...

Good one on gratitude and it helps a lot.

Thanks,
Karim - Mind Power