Offertory Prayer

Each month's Offertory Prayers includes an "Invitation to the Offering" (see below) along with a digital image for those who might want to use it. We hope you will find this a helpful way to remind the people in your pews that their offering travels to many places to make a powerful difference in the lives of people they may never meet. You can find great stories of the difference our giving makes at http://umcgiving.org.

Invitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as our Archives and History Center on the campus of Drew University in Madison, NJ. Here, a small group of dedicated archivists preserve the history and artifacts that keep us connected to our past – what they call “the ministry of memories.” By preserving historical photographs, sound recordings, published documents in digital formats, as well as treasures such as the Bible used by Francis Asbury or the journals and handwritten notes of John Wesley, scholars of today can be reconnected with our beginnings when we were more of a movement than an institution. Many in the church hope that this Holy Spirit movement can be recovered for a new generation, and those hopes are made possible through the work of our Commission on Archives and History. This ministry happens, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about the General Commission on Archives and History at http://www.gcah.org

April 26, 2015 – Fourth Sunday of Easter
O Lord, you are the good shepherd! Your son Jesus laid down his life for all who belong to you. Thank you for nurturing our life and sustaining our faith. In gratitude, we want to help others to know your love. Open our ears to listen to your voice. Open our eyes to see our brothers and sisters in need as sheep of your flock. May our tithes and offerings give voice to Christ's love for all people, especially those who have gone astray. Amen. (John 10:11-18)

April Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship Ministries at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.

Monday, March 8, 2010

The Prodigal, a Reflection on Luke 15:1-3, 11b-19

The respectable people sure didn't like it that Jesus was willing to associate with people who weren't so respectable. And they said so out loud. And Jesus answered them out loud.

The Parable of the Prodigal Son (or, as some put it, the Parable of the Two Sons, or, as others put it, the Parable of the Waiting Father) is part of his response.

Something like what was upsetting the religious leaders keeps on happening. People who don't behave the way we want our children to grow up should be welcomed into our fellowship? Join our local church? Speak at the Annual Conference? Who makes the rules? Who gets to decide who is following them? Have they read the Bible? Don't they care?

These are questions that the respectable church members can ask. Jesus is talking to the respectable people of his time. But, before we address their attitude, let's look at an example of someone who inarguably does not behave the way he should have.

In the parable, the younger son does behave in an unquestionably poor way. He demands his inheritance before his father dies. He squanders it in dissolute living. Then the economy turns against him. Just as he runs out of money, so does the whole country. He finds an unpleasant job that doesn't even pay well.

So hungry that he's eating pig food, he starts comparing his situation with the one his father provides for his employees.

Whether he would have repented even if his circumstances had been different, we don't know.

What we are told is that even though he no longer feels that he deserves to have the status of a son, he wants to return to his father--because his father treats non-sons well.

3 comments:

bthomas said...

Such stories are always problematic for those who mistake merit as the method of God. Grace is always a problem for those who strain to see God through such a poor lens.

The focus of the parable is not so much about the prodigal son or the angry son but the misunderstood father. For Jesus is dealing with people who misunderstood the Father. He uses the parable teach them what they have missed. This father is a unknown mystery to his sons, but by long experience he knows them both very well and never lets them forget who they are. Neither son can go so far away that they cease to be His son. And regardless of how deep might be the consequences of sin, neither makes the rules of the house. That is the Father's prerogative. The father invites both to enter into the house for it is theirs both by birth and by his will. Only one enters. From the narrative it sounds like he decides that to enter the house on the Father's terms is better than any other alternative. The story closes with one son standing, struggling with deciding if he is willing to enter the house on his Father's terms. Recon what he decided?

Sue Whitt said...

Do you think the Pharisees and scribes thought that he was talking about them?

bthomas said...

First they would have to listen. One can only hope that they did listen. There are instances mentioned in which some of the most unlikely of people listened to Jesus. I've often wondered where a sharp up and coming young Pharisee like Saul would have been found when Jesus was out and about teaching. Herod longed to see him, but not enough to actually seek him out. Perhaps the future Apostle of grace found time to stand among the crowd and listen to this rustic rabbi from Galilee.

Now what they thought of what Jesus said is entombed in silence. But these were men of intelligence and ability. It is not reasonable to think that they would fail to "connect the dots" and come even unwillingly to what Jesus was saying. They might have refused to accept it, but they could not possibly have failed to grasp it.