Offertory Prayer

Each month's Offertory Prayers includes an "Invitation to the Offering" (see below) along with a digital image for those who might want to use it. We hope you will find this a helpful way to remind the people in your pews that their offering travels to many places to make a powerful difference in the lives of people they may never meet. You can find great stories of the difference our giving makes at http://umcgiving.org.

nvitation to the Offering
The offering you made last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as Camp and Retreat Ministries that not only touch and shape the lives of children and youth, but adults of all ages as well. While these ministries happen within the boundaries of our annual conferences, resources and training come through a variety of networks, coordinated through the office of Camp and Retreat Ministries at Discipleship Ministries. This office is working to make leaders better prepared and helping those committed to these ministries see the challenges the future might hold. This ministry happens, thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

May 31, 2015 – First Sunday After Pentecost/in Kingdomtide/Trinity Sunday

Holy Lord, the whole earth is full of your glory! We are in awe of your majesty. In great kindness, you reveal yourself as the One who forgives us. You give us gifts and invite us to go into the world to tell your good news. Help us to respond in faith and go where you lead us each day. We dedicate our gifts so that our community will draw closer to you. Amen. (Isaiah 6:1-8)

Learn more about the Camping and Retreat Ministries at: www.umcdiscipleship.org/leadership-resources/camp-retreat-ministries.

May Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship Ministries at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.

Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Church Comity, Reflection on Matthew 18:15-17

Earlier in chapter 18, Jesus is talking about the joy of recovering those who stray from the flock. Now, he's talking about the difficulty of living with those who don't leave. "Here's what you can expect: some church members are going to treat you badly. Don't ignore the problem. Even if you are not at fault, you still have the responsibility to mend the relationship."

Here's the hard part. Start by going directly to the offender. Don't go around telling everybody else how much you are hurt. First, tell the one who hurt you.

Then, if that doesn't work, and only if that doesn't work, share your concerns with a couple of other church members. If that doesn't work, and only if that doesn't work, then you may tell others in the church about the problem.

If the offender won't listen to the whole church, then treat that person like a Gentile and a tax collector.

Notice the irony in this last instruction by remembering how Jesus treated Gentiles and tax collectors.

1 comment:

gavin richardson said...

interesting. someone who was very mad at me told me i needed to read matthew 19 to see how jesus treated people he didn't agree with. i read matt 19 but couldn't get the correlation. i think they were referring to what you are highlighting here. so finding the gentiles & tax collector part interesting