Offertory Prayer

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as the quadrennial gathering of United Methodist youth and adults that happened last month in Orlando at YOUTH 2015! This event brought more than 4800 people together to challenge our youth to embrace their Methodist identity and to “Go On” to a deeper relationship with Christ. The testimonies of lives changed are powerful, and the impact will go on for years. These kinds of cooperative efforts across our connection are made possible thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about ministry with youth and young adults at: http://globalyoungpeople.org

August 2, 2015 – Tenth Sunday after Pentecost / in Kingdomtide

Generous God, we rejoice in your wonderful power! In Christ, you give us the true bread from heaven. You satisfy our spiritual hunger and thirst, filling our hearts with your abundant love. Help us to work not for perishable goods, but for love that endures. May these offerings contribute to your nurturing work in the world. We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen. (John 6:24-35)

August Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.



Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Astonishment about the other recipients, Reflection on Acts 10:44-46

 In Acts 9, Paul learned that Jews could be Christians. In Acts 8, last week's lesson, Philip learned that Gentiles could be Christians.

In Acts 10, Peter, too, learned that Gentiles could be Christians. A messenger from God came to Cornelius, a Roman centurion. A Gentile, an enforcer of the occupation of Israel. Prompted by the Spirit, Peter was willing to break the law and eat with him.

In this week's passage, Peter's sermon to Gentiles is interrupted. We are told that the Holy Spirit fell on all who were listening to him.

All. The ones who had already belonged. And the ones who had not. The old-timers were astounded that the newbies would be included.

How does your congregation react to the notion that the Holy Spirit may be reaching out to people who were raised with different beliefs from yours? Or, how would they react to the notion that the Holy Spirit speaks?

In Acts 2, The Holy Spirit fell on Jews from all lands (We'll read about this week after next). In Acts 8, the Holy Spirit fell on Samaritans (not-quite insiders but not completely different, either).

In this week's reading from Acts 10, the Holy Spirit fell upon all who heard the word. The insiders were astounded that outsiders were recipients.

Questions: Wouldn't the Holy Spirit fallen on them whether they had heard the word or not? Or, is hearing the word necessary for someone to be able to recognize the presence of the Holy Spirit? How did the believers know that the Holy Spirit had been poured out on them--that is, was proof necessary?

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