Offertory Prayer

Your offering last week empowered ministry within our congregation and in response to the needs of our community. It also helped support the work of ministries beyond the local church, such as the quadrennial gathering of United Methodist youth and adults that happened last month in Orlando at YOUTH 2015! This event brought more than 4800 people together to challenge our youth to embrace their Methodist identity and to “Go On” to a deeper relationship with Christ. The testimonies of lives changed are powerful, and the impact will go on for years. These kinds of cooperative efforts across our connection are made possible thanks to the way the people of The United Methodist Church live and give connectionally. I invite you to give generously as we worship God through sharing our gifts, tithes, and offerings.

Learn more about ministry with youth and young adults at: http://globalyoungpeople.org

August 30, 2015 – Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost / in Kingdomtide

Generous and Holy God, every good and perfect gift that touches our lives does indeed come from above, provided through your gracious and boundless love. We bring these gifts, such a small portion of what we have received by your hand, and doing so join them with others that we might be found to be doers of the word and not listeners only. We pray this is the name of Jesus the Christ, our rock and our redeemer. Amen. (James 1:17-27)

August Offertory Prayers were written by the Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Director of Stewardship at Discipleship Ministries, The United Methodist Church.



Monday, September 17, 2012

Welcoming, a Reflection on Mark 9:30-37

In last week's lesson from Mark, Jesus had told the disciples about the suffering he was to undergo and the requirement that following him also meant suffering. In this week's lesson, Jesus again tells his disciples that he will be betrayed and killed and will rise again.

Mark tells us that Jesus restricted this knowledge to the disciples because he didn't want anyone else to know it. I'm wondering if he really needed to be so restrictive about the information. After all, the disciples not only did not understand what he meant; they were afraid to ask him to explain it all to them.

Something apparently they did understand was priority. They argued about who was the greatest. Jesus answered this concern by giving a lesson and an example. An example that told them what greatest meant to him.

He said "Whoever wants to be first must be last and servant of all." He then showed them a little child and said, "When you welcome the weak and defenseless, you are welcoming me."

Not only are we great when we help the weak, we also see him in the weak.

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